Posts tagged: American Broadcasting Company

Changnesia

By , February 28, 2013

Suffering from Changnesia? The only thing you need to remember is that Community is all new tonight and Chang has returned to Greendale!

Chang Returns!
Chang, or “Kevin” as he’s now called, is apparently a victim of “Changnesia.”

Malcolm McDowell Guest Stars!
Greendale’s newest teacher talks about how much he loves the laid-back culture of the Community set.

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NBC repeats of ‘Community’ ’30 Rock’ tied #2 in adults 18-49

By , December 20, 2010

At 8 p.m. ET, an encore telecast of “Community” averaged a 1.2/4 in 18-49 and 3.2 million viewers overall.  In the time period, “Community” tied for #2 among ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and CW in men 18-34.

Source: RBR

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Community Rating Doing well

By , October 18, 2010

At 8 p.m. ET, “Community” (2.2/7 in 18-49, 4.8 million viewers overall) jumped week to week by 22 percent in 18-49 rating (2.2 vs. 1.8) and 15 percent in total viewers (4.806 million vs.4.195 million) to match the show’s highest 18-49 rating since March 4.  Despite intense time-period competition that included CBS’s “Big Bang Theory,” “Community” scored a 16 percent increase on NBC’s average in the slot for the traditional ’09-10 season (1.9, non-sports, “live plus same day”).  In the time period last night, “Community” ranked #2 among NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox in men 18-34 and men 18-49 (tie).
Source: RBR

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Community Ratings

By , October 10, 2010

At 8 p.m. ET, “Community” averaged a 1.8/6 in 18-49 and 4.2 million viewers overall.  Despite intense time-period competition that included CBS’s “Big Bang Theory,” “Community” finished within 0.1 of a point of  NBC’s average in the slot for the traditional ’09-10 season (1.9, non-sports, “live plus same day”).  In the time period last night, “Community” ranked #2 among NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox in men 18-34 and men 18-49 (tie).

Source: RBR

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Community Doing Well Against Survivor

By , February 12, 2010

The two-hour launch of “Survivor: Heroes vs. Villains” drew big numbers for CBS on Thursday night. Not only did the premiere dominate its regular 8 p.m. hour, but it beat “Grey’s Anatomy” at 9 p.m. and helped “The Mentalist” crush “Private Practice” at 10 p.m.

CBS started the night in first with an 8.2/13 for “Survivor: Heroes vs. Villains,” which also averaged a 4.6 demo rating. FOX’s repeat of “Bones” was second with a 4.9/8. ABC’s “The Deep End” was third overall, but tied for fourth in the key demo. NBC’s “Community” and “Parks and Recreation” had a 3.2/5 and finished second for the hour in the 18-49 demo. The CW’s “The Vampire Diaries” was on the low side with a 2.3/4 and a 1.5 demo rating.

Source: HitFix

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Community Episode 14 Ratings

By , January 22, 2010

At 8 p.m. Fox was first with a season-high 3.5 for the surging “Bones,” followed by CBS with a 2.3 for back-to-back repeats of “The Big Bang Theory.” NBC was third with a 2.0 for “Community” (2.1) and “Parks and Recreation” (2.0), ABC fourth with a 1.8 for “End,” CW fifth with a 1.6 for “Diaries” and Univision fifth with a 1.3 for “Hasta que el Dinero Nos Separe.”

Source: Media Life Magazine

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Familiar Faces in Fresh Formulas

By , December 17, 2009

What seemed in early fall a rare outbreak of inspired television writing has in recent months become something rarer—not an epidemic, exactly, but a season impressively stocked with creations drenched in wit and enterprise, all unmistakably reflective of a drive toward formula busting. These things are, of course, always relative. In television these days, one quality hit a season—especially in the impossibly snare-infested comedy genre—seems a lot; two is like breaking the bank.

Yet we’re now finishing a television year that has seen both the emergence of ABC’s uproarious“Modern Family” and its less dazzling but wonderfully mordant lead-in, “The Middle,” about another kind of modern family—a brew of consistent charm and character with a bracing hint of nightmarish reality underlying its sitcom fun. Add to these the most unexpected gem of all—NBC’s “Community,” a satire set in the unlikely precincts of a community college. Its creator, Dan Harmon, was, by his own account, inspired by the semester he once spent at one in pursuit of an effort to strengthen ties with his girlfriend. That relationship didn’t work out in the end, but, happily, the same can’t be said of this whip-smart series about an improbably compelling band of adults taking classes at a sunny academic hell called Greendale Community College.

The same can be said for “Community,” which stars Joel McHale (“The Soup”) in top form as Jeff—a glib but undeniably attractive former lawyer who has gone back to school because his license to practice was revoked (he’d apparently skipped going to law school). The difference here is that the laughs derive entirely from the show’s flinty heart. There are lapses, to be sure, when its creators can’t resist the old siren call—the sitcom impulse to dump a little treacle into the brine. That way lies ruin, as most writers of satire ultimately learn. And “Community” is, despite its doses of warmth and fellowship, nothing but satire in its look at the adults in the study group Jeff runs. They’re all strivers, most of them bent on getting close to Jeff because this disbarred lawyer seems a person of stature. These characters are the product of cold-eyed observation, exquisite at its meanest, particularly when it focuses on an older student—the insufferably pompous Pierce, a character to which Chevy Chase brings considerable authority, and not surprisingly. None of this is to say the series doesn’t offer more varied targets of amusement. Its picture of the sorry lot of obsessives and other deranged types in charge of delivering learning at the college, and of the assorted weasels and buffoons serving as deans and other high officials, is priceless.

Read the full story on the WSJ

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Community Rating

By , December 11, 2009
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CBS easily won every hour time slot in primetime Thursday night with new episodes of Survivor, CSI, and The Mentalist. The network averaged 15.9 million viewers, nearly double what second-place Fox tallied.

Survivor opened the night in first with a 4.3/12 and 13.8 million viewers. Fox was next at 3.1/9 for Bones. NBC drew a 2.3/7 with Community (2.3/7) and Parks and Recreation (2.3/6). ABC’s rerun of FlashForward came in at 0.9/3. The CW’s Vampire Diaries was fifth with a 0.8/2.

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TV ratings: ‘Survivor’ powers CBS Thursday

By , December 5, 2009

Led by ”Survivor: Samoa,” CBS drew 11.1 million viewers and a 7.0 rating/11 share in households for the night. ABC (8.8 million, 5.9/9) came in second, a little ahead of FOX (8.4 million, 5.2/8). NBC took fourth with 5.65 million viewers and a 3.5/6, and The CW (1.95 million, 1.3/2) brought up the rear.

ABC tied CBS for the lead among adults 18-49 at 2.9. FOX drew a 2.7, followed by NBC at 2.4 and The CW at 0.8.

Thursday hour by hour:

8 p.m.

CBS: “Survivor: Samoa” (12.75 million viewers, 7.5/12 households)
FOX: “Bones” (9.9 million, 6.2/10)
ABC: “FlashForward” (7.3 million, 4.6/7)
NBC:Community” (5.4 million, 3.3/6)/”Parks and Recreation” (4.8 million, 3.0/5)
The CW: “The Vampire Diaries” rerun (2 million, 1.3/2)

18-49 leader: “Survivor: Samoa” (3.9)

Source: Zap2It

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NBC’s ‘Community’ loses out to ABC’s ‘Modern Family’

By , November 15, 2009

The LA Times commented that ‘Community’ loses out to ‘Modern Family’, here are some of their reasonings:

“Community,” though, feels like a fourth wheel. Buried amid NBC’s Comedy of the Awkward, this show, about thrown-together students at a community college, is forced to lean on tricks native to those other shows but that are worse suited to this one’s premise. There’s no Michael Scott or Leslie Knope here. And it’s not that Jeff Winger would make for a great traditional hero, or even antihero: He’s generically slick, moderately intelligent and smarmy without cause. He’s not oblivious; he knows too much. Even though other characters — ascendant social outcast Annie (Alison Brie) and self-assured oddball Abed (Danny Pudi) — aspire to the “Office” mold, they’re actually remarkably normal and evenly drawn. (And in the case of Ken Jeong, as the Spanish professor Señor Chang, hilarious.)

Just because a character is unusual for prime time doesn’t mean he or she has to engage in odd behavior — that’s a tenet understood perfectly well by another new ensemble comedy with quirky characters, “Modern Family” (ABC, 9 p.m. Wednesdays). The characters here are just as unfamiliar to prime time — a gay couple with an adopted baby, a May-December romance. All together, “Modern Family” ends up riskier and stranger than “Community” but never feels forced.

Consider the shows’ use of music in its plot lines. Earlier this month, a “Community” secondary story revolved around a character writing a bitter breakup song about his ex, Britta (Gillian Jacobs), called, imaginatively, “Britta Is a B.” That resulted in an intervention by Pierce (Chevy Chase), who joined the band, then quit it, resulting in a second song: “Pierce Is a B.” Neither was memorable beyond the punch line.

By comparison, last month on “Modern Family,” Dylan (Reid Ewing) wrote a song for his girlfriend, Haley (Sarah Hyland). The result, “In the Moonlight (Do Me),” was sharply written, funny and memorable (boosted by a closing sequence when several other characters find themselves humming the song and an online companion video).

What do you think?

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